Anthropology Is The Backbone Of Our Society Essay

Anthropology Is The Backbone Of Our Society Essay

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Anthropology, to much of the population, is a seemingly complex term. Many even believe that the term simply doesn’t apply to their lives. However, this notion is invalid due to the fact that anthropology is essentially the backbone of our society. In a broad and simplistic form, the Oxford English Dictionary defines anthropology as “The science of man, or of mankind, in the widest sense”. For centuries anthropologists have worked towards making the science what it is today. Many advancements have been made through the work of evolutionists early on. In the early 1800’s evolutionists Morgan and Spencer came up with the idea that society moves from simple to complex on a unilinear-based system. This theory mirrored Darwin’s, stating they agree that the evolutionary path is indeed identical for all societies and only one path would be accepted as correct. Nonetheless, a man named Franz Boas introduced the concept of cultural relativism, later terming it historical particularism. His theory explained how people should be less ethnocentric and accept that each culture has its own ideals and practices. Boas wanted the world to understand a culture’s value isn’t diminished because it differs from another. Three of his followers, Robin, Mead, and Benedict, took this approach and created the multilinear theory. This suggests that there are several ways a culture can evolve and each way can indeed be successful. Simply because one culture does not follow the same path another does not make it any less prosperous. Yet another advancement in cultural ecology: the study of the relationship between people and their environment. This study has allowed for the discovery of certain risk factors, especially those that are evident in violent situ...


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...ething. One form of violence is considered inhibiting the life, liberty, and pursuit of happiness of a person, due to the fact that it’s expressed as a basic human right that all people are expected to have. Interestingly enough, Krohn-Hansen brings up the juxtaposition of the English word “violence” and the French word “violence”. While the words are spelled the exact same, their definitions vary slightly. The French word has one definition similar to that of the English version, and one that means an implication to pressure someone into compliance. The latter can be considered a form of moral violence. Symbolic violence is an idea coined by Pierre Bourdieu that is similar to moral violence. It is considered when one person has the ability to manipulate the emotions of another. He considers it the invisible violence because it is often a breach of trust and loyalty.

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